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. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
her career as a lawyer for the n.a.a.c.p. in mississippi. also here, taylor branch, the historian who has, of course, written four books on dr. king and the civil rights era. his later "the king years" recently out in paperback. and our friend, ben jealous, the professional of the n.a.a.c.p. i want to start with you, marian. when you were there, did you realize at the time the effect that dr. king's speech was going to have? >> yes. and i realized as one of my own-- the hundreds of thousands property we were a transforming element of nonviolent witness that was unprecedented in our history, as you indicated, people expecting violence. here you had a huge, multiracial, multifaith, multigenerational-- i was 24 at the time-- witness -- >> what did you feel like? were you excited? >> i was exhilarated. i felt empowered. i felt connected. it's always good to know that you're not alone and there are all these people coming out saying, "we're committed to making america, america." it strengthened me as i was being trained to go down to mississippi and practice law. a great day. >> schieffer:
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
general. i'm from mississippi and my father worked heavily to dissect regate schools in mississippi. my mother didn't have a black high school. my father had to build it. now we have education and equality. but is there a level playing field today? >> as the reverend jesse jackson pointed out today, he said that african americans are less equal -- >> we have the first black president. but unemployment in the black community is on the increase. >> 2.6% black unemployment. versus 6.6% for whites. >> first of all, it's not just a black problem and those indices are for the black community but there are disparities in other communities, also. having said that, i think all of us have to get engaged. it's not just a government problem. one of the key points that president obama mentioned today. everybody has to get involved. when children are born out of wedlock that's not the government. some individuals need to hear what's happening at their churches. men and women need to take responsibility. in all communities. >> he's right, the reverend is right from the standpoint government is suppose
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
flight delays. we do have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the additional rain that we'll also get today. we also have the threat of stronger storms like this afternoon into this evening. just to the east of the rockies into the western plains, biggest threat would be for damaging wind gusts and also for some small hail possible, isolated tornadoes are a possibility but not really a huge threat. temperatures today, really hot down south, well above 100 degrees. cool up north, especially in and around the great lakes region. tomorrow back into the mid 80s. 90s in kansas city. scattered showers and storms will spread into the east as we go into tomorrow. temperatures in the northeast will stay cool and comfortable for one more day. that heat will also spread eastward as we go into tomorrow. brian. >> dylan, thank you very much. going to sports stories, tiger woods looks pretty good going into the final major of the season. still number one in the world. don't forget that. he virtually lapped the field. it was kind of a joke. he took a seven-
george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times overlooked. there was only one woman
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
on the southern mississippi valley. the northeast, is the beautiful spot. temperatures staying below normal. more rain in the forecast by the end of the week. >> we need you to settle something for us. >> gustnado's are real? they don't have to involve sharks? >> always sharks. >>> scary moments for fire crews in boise, idaho running away from a house on fire. look at this just before the collapse. 55 firefighters on the scene battling a three-alarm blaze. they realized something was wrong. radioed for colleagues to get back. they did. >> oh, my goodness. look at that collapse. terrible. >> minor injuries. >> before we move on, it's great to have you back. >> you miss me hitting you, right? beating on you. >> fully recovered. >> i love being back. i showed pictures on twitter. i had a fabulous surprise this morning. it's amazing. >> don't go away, ever again. >> so sweet. you have a big heart. >> 11 minutes past the hour. is student viciously attacked on a bus. the driver, watching the brawl from the front of the bus. should he have stopped the fight. you are going to hear why he didn't, coming u
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for. they're getting medical treatment,
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
angel alumni groups exist from schools including harvard, march kwet and the university of mississippi. schools with a strong sense of spirit and entrepreneurial, computer, math and science programs. bayler university is one of them. >> we are one of four kpos selected to actually present at their angel breakfast. after the presentation we had six weeks of due diligence where they had to go through and interview us and try to poke holes in the business and makd sure we will a viable investment. >> allowing small and medium size businesses to set up e-commerce sites in a few minutes. preferred stock giving grubs money for marketing new hires. he says it should get the firm to its goal of revenue in the low 7 figures in 2014. that's a score for students, alumni as well as the school, bill. >> that's a great idea. get those alumni in there and use their expertise and funds. >> you mentor them and fund them as well. >> thanks very much. stocks made it two for two but just barely. what happens tomorrow? >> stock pros will give you a leg up on friday's stock market action, bill, when we come
, what happened to emmitt till, august 28th, 1955, that this kid visiting mississippi from chicago was said to have wolf whistled at a 21-year-old white woman, carolyn bryant, then goes back to a shack where he is staying with a distant uncle, great uncle, and three or four days later the woman's husband comes in the night with his stepbrother, drags him out of bed. they spend the entire night beating emmitt till to a pulp, to a pulp, then they take him out, shoot him in the head, then take his bullet ridden beaten body, wrap a cotton gin, throw it in the talahatchie river. how is that the equal of what happened between george zimmerman and trayvon martin? i don't know. but people think somehow with their grievance agenda it is. it lessens the credibility of today's civil rights movement. greg? >> you know what, i didn't need a civil rights movement, i'm just a white guy. maybe there will be one for short white people that smoke, i don't know. it is hard for me to say. i do believe there's kind of a battle for survival in this movement and a movement should police itself. how did
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
. met with a famous college basketball team that helped a white university of mississippi team play their first game against african-americans. this of course meeting with some living negro leaguers, the most famous of which is miniminoso. he played in the majors, ron tinsley had some minor league time. but what was interesting about the conversation when it turned to a-rod was this whole issue of these guys seem to have had it. and what's interesting now, you see current players saying the same thing. they're all like, you know what? clean this support up and they're not happy with a-rod heer either. >> tell me your impression of what's going on with this steroid -- first of all, what did they call a performance enhancing drug in your day? coffee? >> coffee. you lucky. and before, we're not making enough to maybe buy one bottle of dom perignon. i remember they used to be tough, people with alcohol and never in my life -- nothing to this day to my life. i never took drugs in my life. not even smoking. before allvy in my mind about how to play tomorrow and i haven't done anything bef
of mississippi and represented to the lobbyist. so of course those companies contacted us and as jack abramoff did end haley barbour did and they wanted to see if their clients could get the foxcom contract or the lg see contact but i put up by the wayside. i was serious about the security of the capital. later when they kept getting complaints from members of congress not from haley barbour jack abramoff but members of congress to set i want to use myself. i called the nsa for national security agency and they came to my office and a private limit and i said tell me the living dead was involved in this. tell me what is the bottom line with this security aspect. they went ahead and they looked at this and we went to a room which was in the capital capital and that's a private room nothing bounces in and nothing bounces up and i won't reveal the information today. security in the capital but they said it's okay to do these if we do them this way. doesn't matter which company does them. the israeli-based company which in fact or the lgc american company it doesn't matter which one. if you do it
stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mole hill -- >> from mississippi, from every mountainside -- >> let freedom ring. and i think people all across america in their hearts believe that freedom should ring for everybody. >> free at last, free at last, thank god, almighty, we are free at last. >> incredible. byron is here with us now. george, this was really one of the defining moments of the 20th century. >> it was. martin luther king said rightly, he appropriated american rhetoric, saying, i'm not trying to change america, i'm trying to reconnect with the american past. and in that sense, he did a wonderful job. >> well, you know, the whole idea of forming a more perfect union. over the centuries, we have tried to perfect this union. this was a moment of really trying to perfect it. mightily. but there was tremendous fear. i remember it very well. my father was majority whip of the congress at the time, a deep southerner, very close with president kennedy. and the fear of violence that was -- that was palpable, and the fear that it would ruin the cause of civil ri
parts of the mississippi belt. it is about flea increasing literacy rates basically eliminating gender disparity in educational aspects and one fact of the progress is almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way that access to higher education includes a status iranian women. especially that westerners would consider this unacceptable in their own societies and the majority of universities are now female. the majority of them are now female. and women's presence is now felt across many disciplines. notwithstanding, we had this with no direct connection on the ground and a cadre of so-called iran experts, many of whom are ex-patriots were iranian americans will flood the revolution in don't see the islamic public. they continue to misinterpret the iranian politics. telling us that the system is on the verge of collapse. we will continue to lose ground in the middle east. and a good example in 2009 we will have an office of wishful thinking on the green movement that emerged out of this campaign, it is solving america's strategic problem for the middle east. they did so even t
in a small two-bedroom house in mississippi, elvis was only 21 years old that summer. ♪ you ain't nothing but a hound dog ♪ >> lee: he created a sensation by performing the song, hip gyrations and all, on both the milton berle and ed sullivan tv shows. elvis and hound dog stayed at number one for what was then a record 11 weeks. ♪ love me tender >> lee: only to be knocked off their perch by elvis himself. his fans certainly loved elvis. more fanatically though than tender. >> announcer: the tempo is 1, 2, 4 for private presley. >> reporter: even a two-year stint in the army failed to dampen the female following. as our own charles kuralt noted at this news conference upon his discharge. >> elvis, you have screaming fans out there. do you still like screaming girls? >> if it wasn't for them, i'd have to re-up in the army. i'll tell you. >> lee: elvis released 31 number one hits during his lifetime earning him the nickname the king. his death from a heart attack in 1977 at just 42 shocked his millions of fans. but hardly discouraged them. elvis impersonators thrive to this day. while de
with teeders ---door key leader us of our allies. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof
.d. law, so ra mississippi, alabama so there is a signal to take on texas. arthel: thank you very much for that update. jon: turn to egypt where two top islamic groups are reportedly seeking a truce with egypt's military a. cording to the associateded press, the groups are willing to stop massive military tests in exchange to crackdown on muslim brotherhood supporters. joining us to talk about this and the larger issues, chris can and political activist who fled egypt in 2011. good to have you on. >> thank you for having me. jon: this request for a truce from the islamist groups, what do you make of that? >> if that's conditioned by the reinstallment of muhammad morsi, i do not think that this is ever going to happen and i do not think that it would be fair to refer to what these muslim brotherhood gatherings as protests. if we can say that the boston bomber was a protestor, there's much protestors as he was. jon: the coptic christians have bourne the brunt of the rage that's issued by many of the muslim brotherhood supporters. so many of the churches have been burned. what's behind th
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
the mississippi river. flash flooding for some of the heavier downpours we're seeing right now. it's a lot about temperatures too, 73 for a high in chicago where the normal high is 83 degrees. we're well into the 100s in parts of texas that will stay the case tomorrow and it'll stay pretty chilly in chicago, 74 degrees with some late day thunderstorms but in the northeast we are starting off a stretch of low humidity, temperatures right around 80 degrees so some areas lucking out with the weather. >> okay, for which we thank you very much, dylan dreyer. >> no one landed the prize in the powerball drawing. it's going to a whopping $400 million. and in today's number ones, the states that spend top dollar on lottery tickets. massachusetts leads the way according to a study last year, average spending, 860 bucks a year per person. georgia second with spending $470. $20 less than third place new york and also beer, let's talk about that coming out on top in a new gallup survey as america's favorite alcoholic beverage. 36% prefer beer. 35% prefer wine and 23% go for hard liquor. >> i told you i didn'
to egypt. gary, greenville, mississippi, republican. good morning. gary, are you there? caller: i am. host: go ahead, sir. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i don't understand how some report the current administration in egypt because they were elected by the people. and we the american people, we supported their election. i mean, even john mccain who's a celebrated veteran said that this is a coo there. so i'm not so much for or against anything, but i think when americans call your show that we should understand that we supported this democratic effort that took place in egypt. and we should consider those things before we get on here talking negatively or positively about the subject. but i just don't understand how e're so kind of shallow in our support for the previous administration in egypt because again, they were duly elected by the people and then secondly as i mentioned before, one of the most celebrated veterans in this nation, senator mccain went there. he visited, so on and so forth, and he said that the -- that it was a coo. so that's just my thoughts. hos
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
southern strategy, of ronald reagan's infamous trip to philadelphia, mississippi, now to the dismantling of the voting rights act and restricting voting laws we're seeing. is it disappointing that republicans weren't part of the march on washington anniversary? of course it was. but is it a surprise? not really. it's the story of the last 50 years. real football fans love a good snowball. if you are the governor of the state hosting the first outdoor cold weather super bowl ever, are you really supposed to say that's what you are hoping for? we'll tackle that next. we believe it can be the most valuable real estate on earth. ♪ that's why we designed the subaru forester from the back seat forward. the intelligently designed, responsibly built, completely restyled subaru forester. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. and this park is the inside of your body. you see the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels to trap and remove some waste. and that gelling also helps to lower some cholesterol. it even traps some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels as part of
from katrina: how my mississippi hometown lost it all what mattered." i want to ask a brief question. how do you get cities to be willing to invest in resilience in the tough times in something that might happen. preparing for the possible when they are dealing with so many presses issues right now, again, the economy, crime,th. >> thank you. i would like jane first to lead off about a project might be working on. >> david mentioned that i'm working on a project, i have been because we have been so blessed in joplin and certainly not become experts by any mean. i think we have a set of practical experience. i've collected so far about 40 essays from people across all sector of joplin who are vod -- involved in recovery from the hospital chief to the city manager to the superintendent of schools about what we learn in the first year we think are lessons can pass on what we wish wed had known. the more i publicly state my goal the more it has to happen. i'm hoping i'll be done with it by the end of september and able to give it out to anyone in a way that is interested in a community o
, and it is a great honor. somebody who started out their r adult years as a reporter in jackson, mississippi, this is a great humbling honor. i am pleased to be here with people who have helped make me who i am and supported me in this work. bond, whoah, julian has been one of my hero since i was a small child. [applause] julian's wife pam horwitz amid the great members of the naacp staff come including -- is leading the charge on our work to secure voting rights across this country. iriethankful to jeff and for extending this welcome to the press club. to the press club staff and ms. cook. ever clearerecomes that the media continues to play and inform our conversation about race and being that the conscience of our country. we are grateful to "the new york and the role it played in helping stop and frisk in new york city. today i want to thank the man who is been my cocaptain of the national staff for the last five years, roger. chief operating officer, and last year you might recall there were a lot of questions. indeed, throughout 2011 and 2012, or questions, we would like folks turn out
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